SPOTLIGHT ON THE CURRENT ISSUE
EDITORS
Robert Frykberg
DPM, MPH
Editor-In-Chief
Aksone Nouvong
DPM
Asst. Editor
FEATURED LECTURES FROM PRESENT PODIATRY
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CURRENT ISSUE

Retrospective analysis of two biologic wound dressings: bilayered skin substitute versus porcine submucosa
Retrospective analysis of two biologic wound dressings: bilayered skin substitute versus porcine submucosa

Diabetic foot ulcerations (DFU) are a common medical problem and are likely to become a greater problem as diabetes prevalence rises. Several biologic dressings have been developed with indications for DFUs.

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Risk factors of diabetic foot ulcer in patients attending diabetic foot outpatient clinic at Tanta University Hospital in Egypt
Risk factors of diabetic foot ulcer in patients attending diabetic foot outpatient clinic at Tanta University Hospital in Egypt

Foot ulceration is one of the most serious and disabling complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). It is the most common cause of non-traumatic foot amputation worldwide. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) in a group of diabetic patients and to describe the risk factors associated with this disease in the studied patients.

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Are all wound products created equally? The re-emergence of natural honey
Are all wound products created equally? The re-emergence of natural honey

A major impediment to treating diabetic foot ulcers is the vast array of costly wound dressings that many health practitioners currently use. These vary tremendously from cotton and potato peel, to biosynthetics, tissue engineering, growth factor biological dressings, nanocrystalline silver, and skin substitutes.

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Charcot neuroarthropathy following dorsiflexory wedge osteotomy of the first metatarsocuneiform joint
Charcot neuroarthropathy following dorsiflexory wedge osteotomy of the first metatarsocuneiform joint

Operating on diabetic patients comes with risk. Possible complications include poor or delayed soft tissue and bone healing, infection, disruption of glycemic control, renal issues, postoperative myocardial ischemia, stroke, and death. Pre-operatively the surgeon can attempt to mitigate the potential for a post-operative problem. One complication the surgeon often cannot mitigate is the development of Charcot Neuroarthropathy (CN).

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